Category Archives: Health

Hailing Frequencies Open…

SilverHubby shown at the waist, clothed, his hands holding a collar.

Back in September, it was with regret that we announced that this blog was going on hiatus. Various things, mostly health-related, were severely interfering with our ability to keep blogging.

Well, the health stuff hasn’t gone away. It has, if anything, got worse, with my recent diagnosis of fibromyalgia.

But we’ve been doing some BDSM stuff during this time too. We are both disabled to varying degrees – SIlverdrop is in a wheelchair. Our disabilities were (and are still) making it very difficult to get back to the 24/7 BDSM dynamic we once enjoyed and loved. But we wanted to see what we could do, not what we couldn’t.

Our old written contract, written twelve-ish years ago when we were both relatively fit and healthy,  was more or less completely invalidated as our health deteriorated, so we wanted to see if we could work out a new contract that would focus primarily on what we still could do. We looked on the Interwebz to see what other disabled people were doing and you know what? There is almost no literature out there!

So we’ve thrashed out (pun semi-intentional) a new contract and are still working hard at it. We may even publish it somewhere soon.

Here, as a teaser, is something we just added to it:-

Slavegirl.

Something to remember when you do, or think about doing, any of these things:

  • Bring your collar to me
  • Bring a toy to me
  • Initiate sex
  • Anything related to our BDSM dynamic

None of the above constitute ‘topping from the bottom’. They are you letting me know, in a direct yet submissive way, that you are able for some sort of interaction. This can range from full sex at one end of the spectrum, to a symbolic spanking while collared at the other.

Master

Wanna see more?

Oh! Happy New Year to you all.

 

SilverHubby and Silverdrop

Announcement: Hailing Frequencies (Temporarily?) Closed

It is with great sadness that we must announce that this blog is going on hiatus.

Those of you who read us regularly will have noticed that Silverdrop rarely posts here these days and we stopped reviewing sex toys months ago. We recently had dinner with the really quite lovely and not at all axe-murderish Molly and her husband DomSigns and Molly mentioned that she had noticed. Silverdrop explained that she only has so much non-resting energy a day, and that she has told me either I can have most of it, or the blog can. You might guess my choice.

I miss the times when the pair of us would have ‘conversations’ in posts, to the general amusement and apparent enjoyment of you, dear reader. Without that interaction, contributing here and the memes we love (SinfulSunday and Wicked Wednesday especially) has become a chore and rather less fun.

But, and it’s a big but, my physical condition is also very slowly worsening, so I too have less energy to give to things. I choose to spend the majority of that energy on Silverdrop – loving her and caring for her. I know you will understand. Consequently, we must PTP (Protect The Property) and reduce the number of ‘things’ on our To Do lists.

Together, always and all ways.

 

PS. We’ll still be around on Twitter as @SilverDomUK and @SilverdropUK, so expect the usual silliness there.

And click below to see who else is being sinful this SinfulSunday.

Sinful Sunday

The female blogger Silverdrop, shown from shoulders to waist, nude, with her long brown hair covering her breasts.

Where we started from

Ooo and it’s alright and it’s comin’ ‘long
We got to get right back to where we started from

We used to be into pretty intense BDSM. I liked being caned. I liked it when it left marks. I liked it even when I hated it. I was into the 24/7 TPE (total power exchange) and everything it involved.

Then I fell ill and everything came to a screeching halt.

Fibromyalgia generally starts with a triggering event – an infection, an accident, a bad reaction to a chemical – something that looks like the normal ‘Oh crap, I’m going to be pretty bad off for a few days or weeks!’ It takes time to realize that the triggering event has ended, but the illness is still going on. Then it takes time after that for the actual diagnosis to come in.

So first, play came to a stop because I had what I thought was a bad flu. We’d start up again when I recovered, we thought. It was months and months before we learned it was fibromyalgia, and I probably wasn’t ever getting better. By that time, most of our kinky activity was fantasy only, because it was such a victory just to manage sex. Bondage? Kneeling? Pain play? Forget it.

Then as I slipped more and more into the role of a sick person, and SilverDom became more and more responsible for being my carer, we encountered another problem with power exchange. The sub/slave/bottom needs to have power before they can give it away. You can’t eroticise powerlessness if that’s where you started. That’s one reason (of many) that genuine slavery isn’t sexy. A book we’ve been reading recently called this the safety valve when referring to mindfuck play – a sliding mental state going from “I know I’m safe” to “But what if I’m not?” in the head of the bottom, allowing them to play on the edge of fear. With power exchange that “safe” setting is “I know we’re equals.

But what if we’re not? What if one of us is fully dependent on the other? What if one of us needs their food cut up, needs help getting bathed, needs help to dress, needs their wheelchair pushed? Can that person really surrender any more fully to their dominant?

There are many physical limitations in the way of enjoying BDSM the way we used to. Kneeling is a thing of the past. Sensory overload can be brutal. It would be impossible for me to endure the sort of bondage that holds me in a fixed position. But the emotional limitation was the most difficult. It may always be.

Finally, a few weeks ago, one of us said, “It’s like we’re beginners again,” and after that came the idea to buy a general kinky handbook to read together.

We’re making notes on how to re-introduce the dynamic into our relationship. We’ve started with a few minutes a day wearing a very light “collar” that’s really not much more than a leather thong necklace. I ordered some rope from Lovehoney, and I’m enjoying playing with it very much. Best of all, we’ve discovered that impact play – so long as we don’t overdo it, and make sure to use ALL sting and NO thud – is still possible.

It’s working. And it’s wonderful,

Love is good, love can be strong
We got to get right back to where we started from

 

Our Contraception Journey Part 10: How Much Longer?

How Much Longer?

Part 10 of a series. We’ve been through nearly every available contraception method in our efforts to find the right solution for us. Just over a month ago, I asked my GP to refer me for female sterilisation. Today we went to the gynaecology clinic.

A 3D drawing showing the uterus, ovaries, fallopian tubes, cervix, and upper vaginaThis time, instead of going to the GP’s office or the sexual health clinic, we had to go to the hospital outpatient clinic.

Things went wrong from the start. We forgot things we needed to have with us. Traffic was bad. Parking is terrible there. Even with a disabled parking badge, we were such a long way from the entrance. The ramp was poorly designed and so narrow that I doubt a powered wheelchair could use it. The front doors weren’t available. We had to use a side entrance. The reception desk was so high that from the wheelchair, I could barely look over the top of it to talk to the receptionist. As usual, there was no space set aside in the waiting room for wheelchairs to park. They were running about 30 minutes late. The waiting room was noisy.

Eventually, I was seen. The gynaecologist was male, which no longer bothers me. English was not his first language, which also doesn’t bother me. He talked in a low voice and kept looking down. THAT bothered me. I had such a hard time hearing him. When he was doing the exam and he asked me to cough, his voice was so low that I assumed he was speaking to the nurse. He had to ask three times.

Female sterilisation is a low priority procedure for the NHS. My GP has to approve the funding. Apparently the fact that she referred me there doesn’t count as approval. You can’t make this shit up. The best guess is that it should be done within four months.

Four. Months.

We hardly ever have vaginal sex these days. There are toys, hands, mouths, bottoms… it just seems easier than to try and deal with the condom and the pregnancy risk.

To be continued…

Our Contraception Journey Part 1: Why is Contraception so Hard?
Our Contraception Journey Part 2: Sterilisation
Our Contraception Journey Part 3: Vasectomy Complications
Our Contraception Journey Part 4: Cerazette
Our Contraception Journey Part 5: Further Vasectomy Complications
Our Contraception Journey Part 6: Cerazette Complications
Our Contraception Journey Part 7: Female Sterilisation
Our Contraception Journey Part 8: Mirena IUS
Our Contraception Journey Part 9: Another Failure

 

The female blogger Silverdrop, shown from shoulders to waist, nude, with her long brown hair covering her breasts.

Our Contraception Journey Part 9: Another Failure

Another Failure

Part 9 of a series. We’ve been through nearly every available contraception method in our efforts to find the right solution for us. Since the last update was posted two weeks ago, we’ve caught up with the present. Now updates will occur as and when circumstances warrant.

A model of a human uterus with a Mirena Intrauterine system in place.

Of course it didn’t work.

I’ve had the Mirena IUS in for 49 days, and bled for 36 of them. Nothing heavy. Just spotting.

Just like my body reacted with the Paraguard IUD, when I kept the thing in for months and months hoping I would adjust.

Neither SilverHubby nor I think it’s worth trying any longer with this one. I’m having the same symptoms as I did before, so it seems likely that my body isn’t going to accept any sort of implant. And there’s still the suspicion that if I get off of hormones completely, perhaps my libido will return and my migraines will lessen.

I’m scheduled to have it taken out before Christmas. And I’ll ask my GP to refer me for female sterilisation. At this point, we have literally tried everything but that.

Part of me expects there will be a medical reason why we can’t have that done either.

God, I hope not.

To be continued…

Our Contraception Journey Part 1: Why is Contraception so Hard?
Our Contraception Journey Part 2: Sterilisation
Our Contraception Journey Part 3: Vasectomy Complications
Our Contraception Journey Part 4: Cerazette
Our Contraception Journey Part 5: Further Vasectomy Complications
Our Contraception Journey Part 6: Cerazette Complications
Our Contraception Journey Part 7: Female Sterilisation
Our Contraception Journey Part 8: Mirena IUS

 

The female blogger Silverdrop, shown from shoulders to waist, nude, with her long brown hair covering her breasts.

Our Contraception Journey Part 8: Mirena IUS

Mirena IntraUterine System

Part 8 of a weekly series. We’ve been through nearly every available contraception method in our efforts to find the right solution for us. This week, we consider the Mirena IntraUterine System.

A model of a human uterus with a Mirena Intrauterine system in place.

This is not the same IUD I tried before.

After deciding that female sterilisation was probably our only solution, we went back to the Family Planning Clinic for one last, desperate hope that there was something available that wouldn’t require surgery.

We took a long printout of everything we’ve tried before and why it hasn’t worked for us. The nurse practitioner who spoke to us spent quite a while looking over it, and then said, “I think there is one thing you may have overlooked.”

At this point, we were rather surprised – we had hoped there was something, but we’d done so much research, we didn’t know how it was possible that we could have missed anything. And then she asked us what we knew about the Mirena – an intrauterine device with hormones.

My first question was, “Would that work for me when I’ve had problems with an IUD before?” and before she could answer “And what about all the problems I’ve had with hormonal contraception?”

She explained the hormone issue first. The hormone would be the same hormone used in the contraceptive patch, implant, or pill, but because it’s being released locally within the uterus, rather than systemically, the dosage is much lower. The migraines and libido problems would hopefully not occur, or would occur to a more manageable degree.

As for the second question, it turns out this IUD is built completely differently than the one I used before. I had looked at Mirena and thought ‘This has all the problems I had before, plus hormones? NO THANKS!’ But the Paraguard IUD that I used before worked by releasing copper into the uterus which makes the uterus hostile to sperm. It can also act as an irritant to the uterine lining, which is probably what caused me a low level of daily bleeding rather than a monthly period.

Mirena, however, has no copper. It works by releasing progestogen, thinning the uterine lining to prevent implantation and thickening cervical mucous to make it more difficult for sperm to enter the uterus. The nurse explained to me that rather than causing bleeding, the way the Paraguard IUD does, the Mirena often causes periods to diminish or stop completely.

We were told that if this doesn’t work for us, then we really do have no other options other than female sterilisation. The nurse asked if we wanted to go home and discuss it first, and I said, “No. I want to try this. How soon can we get it inserted?” She made us an appointment for the following week, and warned us not to have vaginal sex at all before then, even with condoms, just to be absolutely sure there’s no pregnancy.

A week later, we turned up for our appointment. I don’t know what it is about the NHS, but even though stirrups are standard practice in the US for gynaecological exams, I’ve never yet seen them used over here. What’s up with that? Are stirrups too expensive or something? It certainly would have been more comfortable if I’d had them.

It wasn’t quite as painful as I remembered from the last time. After cranking me open with the speculum, the nurse did use a local anaesthesia, though it wasn’t nearly as anaesthetic as I would have liked. I couldn’t really see what he was doing, but there seemed to be lots of things entering and exiting at various times. There were two really painful moments. One was when something went up into the cervix. That was not fun. Then there was some poking around in my uterus, which was like menstrual cramps on steroids and carrying a switchblade. Okay, I’ve never been pregnant, never had endometriosis, and never had uterine fibroids, so I am SO not qualified to whine about uterine pain. But it was not pleasant.

Finally he was done, but it still took a while to get everything inside swabbed up again and the speculum removed. I put a pad in when I dressed, but there was no obvious bleeding. Just lots of cramping. I’m home now, with a hot water bottle on my abdomen, which feels nice.

Aftercare instructions are these: No unprotected sex for 7 days, no tampons for 2 weeks, followup appointment in 6 weeks to check placement, self-check of the strings each month, and replace it in 5 years. Assuming it works for me, and it doesn’t have to come out early.

I just really really hope Mirena is finally the contraception option that will work for us. Because the next stop after this is the operating table.

Find out how it went in Part 9


To be continued…

Our Contraception Journey Part 1: Why is Contraception so Hard?
Our Contraception Journey Part 2: Sterilisation
Our Contraception Journey Part 3: Vasectomy Complications
Our Contraception Journey Part 4: Cerazette
Our Contraception Journey Part 5: Further Vasectomy Complications
Our Contraception Journey Part 6: Cerazette Complications
Our Contraception Journey Part 7: Female Sterilisation

The female blogger Silverdrop, shown from shoulders to waist, nude, with her long brown hair covering her breasts.

Our Contraception Journey Part 7: Female Sterilisation

Female Sterilisation

Part 7 of a weekly series. We’ve been through nearly every available contraception method in our efforts to find the right solution for us.

A diagram of the female reproductive system, as seen in a side view cross section.After discovering that I needed to stop using Cerazette, we went back to the NHS’s list of possible birth control methods. SilverHubby has used the diaphragm before with a former partner and already knew that he hated it. In fact, the words he used were ‘I’d rather use condoms’. I’d previously had a bad reaction to spermicidal jelly, a necessary when using the diaphragm or cervical cap, which further eliminated it as a choice. We went over the list again and again, trying to find something we could live with.

Barrier Methods

  • caps – Requires spermicidal jelly.
  • condoms (female) – Expensive and not widely available.
  • condoms (male) – Too much friction for me. Uncomfortable for him.
  • diaphragms – Requires spermicidal jelly. Hated by SilverHubby.

Hormonal Methods

Intrauterine

You Have Got to be Kidding Me

Permanent Sterilisation

The various hormonal methods were rejected since they were all variations of what I’d already tried. Hormones of any sort are going to fuck with my libido or cause migraines or both. Barrier methods are a pain in the ass. I had a bad reaction to the IUD some years back and had to have it removed after only six months. Natural Family Planning, oh my god no, no, no, a million times no. Male sterilisation has already been ruled out.

So that leaves female sterilisation. On the one hand, I really hated the idea of being operated on. On the other hand, if I take the hit now, then we won’t ever have to deal with the whole contraception issue again.

Currently, in the UK, there are two methods of female sterilisation. The first is the standard tubal ligation, in which the fallopian tubes are cut, stitched, or clipped in some way to prevent an egg from reaching the uterus. The other is a non-surgical method called Essure, in which implants are placed inside each tube, causing scar tissue to form and eventually fully block the fallopian tubes.

At first, I really liked the Essure idea, because of the ‘non-surgical’ part of the description. Then it hit the news recently that Erin Brockovich is campaigning against Essure because of the problems some women are having with it. I went to that site and read the stories, and while some of them didn’t seem applicable – one woman, for example, was already pregnant when she had Essure put in. She carried the child to term, but sometime during the pregnancy or recovery the implants perforated the fallopian tubes – it did remind me that I’d be putting something inside my body that might cause a bad reaction, like when the IUD made me bleed constantly. In the end, we learned there are no doctors trained in the Essure procedure in my region, which eliminated it as a possibility.

I read everything I could find about female sterilisation, particularly personal stories, and finally decided it was probably the best decision for us. So we made another appointment with the Family Planning clinic to discuss it.


To be continued…

Our Contraception Journey Part 1: Why is Contraception so Hard?
Our Contraception Journey Part 2: Sterilisation
Our Contraception Journey Part 3: Vasectomy Complications
Our Contraception Journey Part 4: Cerazette
Our Contraception Journey Part 5: Further Vasectomy Complications
Our Contraception Journey Part 6: Cerazette Complications

The female blogger Silverdrop, shown from shoulders to waist, nude, with her long brown hair covering her breasts.

Our Contraception Journey Part 6: Cerazette Complications

Cerazette Complications

Part 6 of a weekly series. We’ve been through nearly every available contraception method in our efforts to find the right solution for us.

A yellow foil card containing a month's supply of Cerazette birth control pills.

Not the answer

By the time SilverHubby had his urology appointment, I’d been on the Cerazette for several months. My period dwindled, then disappeared completely – a side effect that I found very welcome. I didn’t have any difficulties with taking the pill every day. We looked at female sterilisation again, but decided that as long as the pill was working for me, there was no reason to do something that invasive.

Gradually, over the course of the year, my libido started to diminish. It happened so gradually that it took us a while to recognize there was a problem. We went to the GP and discussed the various possibilities. Quite a lot of bloodwork was scheduled. But of course, in order to properly test my hormone levels, I’d have to go off the pill for a month.

For that month, we went back to our fallback method of contraception – taking vaginal intercourse off the menu in favour of oral, anal, and mutual masturbation. The month passed, I got lots of blood drawn, and I jumped right back on the pill again.

Unfortunately, the blood results didn’t show any obvious causes for my libido problems. And that’s when the GP said, “Sometimes, the pill can cause a loss of libido, and you’ll need to be off of the pill for several months before it returns.” She suggested going back to the Family Planning clinic to talk to them about the diaphragm or cervical cap.

And so, there we were, back at the discussion we seem to have every year or so – our contraception method isn’t working, so what do we do now?


To be continued…

Our Contraception Journey Part 1: Why is Contraception so Hard?
Our Contraception Journey Part 2: Sterilisation
Our Contraception Journey Part 3: Vasectomy Complications
Our Contraception Journey Part 4: Cerazette
Our Contraception Journey Part 5: The Urology Appointment

SilverHubby shown at the waist, clothed, his hands holding a collar.

Our Contraception Journey Part 5: The Urology Appointment

The Urology Appointment

Part 5 of a weekly series. We’ve been through nearly every available contraception method in our efforts to find the right solution for us.

SIlverHubby.

A drawing of a urology exam - a pair of hands holding the penis aside and identifying the vas deferens by feel.So SIlverdrop was using Cerazette. So she was unlikely to get pregnant. Vaginal sex was back on the menu, right? Wrong. In fact, pretty much all forms of sex suddenly went off the menu for much of the time. Why? Because Cerazette is a low hormone dose pill, it still triggered migraines in my beloved. Bad ones. Sometimes last days. I don’t want any form of sex when I have a normal headache, so I understood-ish how Silverdrop was feeling. Luckily, I don’t get migraines, but it hurts like hell to see her suffering.

Honestly, it’s enough to make you cry, isn’t it? Well, we nearly did a few times. We love each other. We’re soulmates. We like sex. A lot. It’s horrible for both of us when other things get in the way.

Anyway, at around this time my appointment to see a urology surgeon came through. You can see why a simple, one teensy cut in Doctor’s office, tubal ligation wasn’t possible for me in Part Three of this series.

I was only in the waiting room for ten minutes before I was called in to see the surgeon. This was a pleasant surprise – long waits are not uncommon. The surgeon was polite, professional and was easy to talk to. Most importantly, he had clearly read my file and knew my medical history well. This inspires confidence in a patient.

He needed to perform a physical examination of course, but I am used to those and they have long since ceased to bother or embarrass me. The cold gets to me a bit though.

The urology examination confirmed what my GP (Primary Care Physician US) found. My right testicle rides high (one riding higher than the other is apparently very common) and it would almost certainly not be possible to do the minimally-invasive procedure. This left traditional surgery i.e. scalpels out and hack away. Sorry, was that too melodramatic?

Initially, this seemed like something I could sign up for. The incision would be relatively small and I would be in and out of hospital the same day (probably), even though it would be done under general anaesthetic. Can you hear the “But…” coming?

He went on to explain the problems. We know from experience that my Type II Diabetes causes me to heal very slowly. As in 18 months and a small hole in my side after it completely healed spider bite! This coupled with the added complication of an old surgical scar right where the incision needed to be, meant that he was willing to perform the surgery, but warned me the likelihood of complications was much higher than normal. *sigh*

I initially agreed to it anyway, as it would be 10-12 weeks for it to be scheduled at non-emergency NHS speeds. I left his office with a heavy heart.

I discussed the visit at some length with Silverdrop, and we finally decided the risks were too great. I called the urology surgeon’s office and cancelled the procedure.

Can we have some vaginal sex yet, pretty please?

So. What next? Surgery for SD and all the complications that could bring?

Next week: Cerazette Complications. Yes, the saga goes on.

 


To be continued….

Our Contraception Journey Part 1: Why is Contraception so Hard?
Our Contraception Journey Part 2: Sterilisation
Our Contraception Journey Part 3: Vasectomy Complications
Our Contraception Journey Part 4: Cerazette

Our Contraception Journey Part 4: Cerazette

Cerazette

Part 4 of a weekly series. We’ve been through nearly every available contraception method in our efforts to find the right solution for us.

Originally published January 27, 2012

A yellow foil card containing a month's supply of Cerazette birth control pills.

Another option

After deciding as a couple to get a vasectomy (part 1) and discovering that complications would prevent this from happening quickly, we had to look again at our birth control options.

It wasn’t easy for my husband (then my boyfriend) to decide to get a vasectomy. When he finally made that decision, it was very disheartening when he learned at his appointment that his vas deferens were too inflamed to allow the procedure to be done that day. He would need a referral to a urologist to find out if a vasectomy will be possible at all for him, and it might need to be under general anaesthesia.

In the meantime, we were still using condoms as our birth control method and were thoroughly unhappy with that. I am peri-menopausal and have issues with vaginal dryness. He is larger than average and finds even large sized condoms uncomfortable. It got to where we were having vaginal intercourse less and less often. Anal sex became our preferred form of intercourse, with oral sex, pegging, mutual masturbation, and various forms of “outercourse” available for variety. Obviously, we wanted to put vaginal intercourse back on the menu!

I wrote in Part 1 that I haven’t been able to use hormonal birth control for years, but this isn’t precisely true. It is the combined birth control pill – the pill that uses both oestrogen and progestogen – that causes me to have migraines. There is another hormonal option, which is to use progestogen only in various forms – injection, IUD, implant, or pill.

The reason I hadn’t considered any of those seriously before was because of the delivery method. The injection lasts about three months – which means if that were to cause me problems, I’d be stuck with those symptoms for that long. I’ve previously had problems with a non-hormonal IUD. And I had heard that the Progestogen only pill (also known as POP or mini-pill) had to be taken at the same time each day – a level of consistency that I would not trust myself to manage.

That left the implant. I wasn’t thrilled with the idea of an implant, because I knew there would be at least two appointments to get it – one to advise, and another to do the procedure. And if I wanted it removed because of side effects, then there would likely be two appointments for that as well. But since my husband’s urology referral would take even longer, it seemed worth at least learning more.

We phoned the Family Planning Clinic for an appointment and were able to be seen within a week. If you know much about England’s NHS, then you’ll understand my surprise. I’m used to waiting much longer for anything that isn’t an emergency. We were seen by a nurse practitioner who seemed very knowledgeable. He seemed pleased that we had done our research before we arrived and knew about the various types of contraception available.

But then he suggested something I had not heard of – a progestogen only pill known as Cerazette. (Unfortunately for most of the readers of this article, Cerazette does not seem to be available in the US.) It uses a form of progestogen known as Desogestrel, which works not only by thickening the mucous lining of the cervix to prevent sperm from entering, but also works to prevent ovulation. Because of this dual mechanism of action, Cerazette has a twelve hour window for taking the pill every day. This is much more forgiving than the standard POP, which only has a three hour window.

This sounded ideal for our needs. If it gave me difficulties, I could stop taking it right away, without having to make any appointments. And if it worked, I could stay on it until my husband’s vasectomy was complete. After a little more discussion, my husband and I decided to give it a try. After two weeks of use, I have noticed that it affects my mood, but so far it hasn’t caused migraines.

The combined Pill is usually taken on a rhythm of three weeks on, one week off, with the period occurring during the off-week. The POP is different. It is taken continuously, and the menstrual flow often subsides to light spotting, or ends entirely. Some women may find it a bit disturbing not to have a monthly period, as they feel that it isn’t natural, or worry that if an accidental pregnancy occurs, they won’t learn of it. But most women are delighted not to have to deal with the inconvenience of menstruation. Unfortunately, the spotting can be irregular and unpredictable, which can introduce its own issues.

It isn’t without risks. If a pregnancy were to occur anyway, perhaps due to a missed pill or something else that interfered with its action, then the chances are higher that the pregnancy would be ectopic – a life threatening situation for the mother, and one in which the pregnancy cannot be salvaged. More concerning to me is that desogestrel has been linked to an increased risk of blood clots compared to other versions of progestogen. If I intended for this to be our final contraception choice, then I would need to discuss this further with my GP, as I have other risk factors for blood clots. However, this is meant to get us through the next few months while we await my husband’s urology referral. We still hope that he will be able to get a vasectomy.

If it turns out he can’t, then we’ll have a new decision to make: whether I should stay on Cerazette, switch to an implant, or re-consider surgery. But we both hope it won’t come to that, and that my next article on this topic will be about male sterilization again.


Of course if you’ve been following us up until now, you’ll know it wasn’t nearly so simple. Tune in next week for more of adventures in contraception!

Our Contraception Journey Part 1: Why is Contraception so Hard?
Our Contraception Journey Part 2: Sterilisation
Our Contraception Journey Part 3: Vasectomy Complications